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Forest Pests & Diseases of NB

What is an invasive species?

"Alien species are those that have become established outside their historical, natural range. Often these species are introduced by people, or they spread on their own. Most alien species cause little harm, or may be beneficial. When they cause harm to our environment, the economy, or to society, they are called invasive alien species, often shortened to invasive species."

 NRCan, Adapting to climate change: The story of invasive insects in Canada’s forests

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The Invasive Species Training Program has an online training portal offering various courses in relation to invasive species.

Each course consists of lessons for identifying, preventing and/or managing invasive species.

Some courses are free, some have a fee.  Each course is available for one year (365 days) from the purchase date.

Some invasive species found in New Brunswick:

Climate change is expanding the geographic range of Ixodes scapularis ticks and the risk of Lyme disease is increasing in New Brunswick.

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photo credit: inspection.canada.ca

2023 update by NBISC:

"This summer we continued our Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) monitoring as part of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) wider monitoring effort. With the help of several community partners, we were able to install 15 traps on Ash Trees throughout the province. The traps are baited to attract EAB, and their presence/absence gives us information on their spread throughout NB. Detections will also inform changes to CFIA’s EAB regulated areas. This year there were no detections at any of our sites."

HEMLOCK WOOLLY ADELGID

Adelges tsugae

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photo credit: Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan

BALSAM WOOLLY ADELGID

Adelges piceae

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photo credit: Jean-Paul Laplante

SPRUCE BUDWORM

Choristoneura fumiferana

SPONGY MOTH AKA LDD

Lymantria dispar dispar

formerly known as European Gypsy Moth

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